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LinuxCon [clear filter]
Monday, October 13
 

11:15am

Is SSH Really Secure? - Peter Tornberg, Fox Technologies
SSH is nearly ubiquitous in today’s enterprises, and is the predominant tool for managing Linux servers and the applications and data that they host.  Poor practices around the deployment and management of the SSH infrastructure has been blamed or associated with various breaches, and has gained considerable attention from management and administrators. A number of reports over that last two years have exposed the vulnerabilities in SSH; not in the protocol or software itself, but in the poor practices deploying, managing and maintaining control over it.

SSH must be managed properly, in a way that accounts for its various methods of authentication, and in a way that accounts for its various features. But, even properly managing SSH alone does not actually ‘secure’ an SSH deployment.  SSH relies on accounts, and they must be accounted for in a security plan,  along with what people are allowed to do once they connect.

In this presentation, we will discuss the numerous pitfalls and common mistakes related to SSH deployment; as well as best practices in properly deploying SSH across your diverse server environment.

Speakers
PT

Peter Tornberg

Peter Tornberg is responsible for FoxT engineering including Software Development and Software Quality Assurance. Peter joins FoxT with 15 years of experience in the IT Security industry where he has held a variety of Management and Architect roles. With deep understanding of Identity... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 112

11:15am

[REPLACEMENT SESSION] How to Collaborate on Linux Kernel Development - Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Samsung
This session is replacing "Clang & LLVM: How They Can Improve Your Live as a Developer - Tilmann Scheller, Samsung"

On this presentation, Mauro will bold the rules of tomb for developers that want to improve and contribute with the Linux Kernel and how the upstream Kernel community works. 

Speakers
avatar for Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Samsung

Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Samsung

Linux Kernel Media Maintainer, Samsung
Mauro is the upstream maintainer of the Linux kernel media and EDAC subsystems, and also a major contributor for the Reliability Availability and Serviceability (RAS) subsystems. Mauro also maintains Tizen on Yocto packages upstream. He works for the Samsung Open Source Group since... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 01

11:15am

Evaluation of Real-time Performance in Embedded Linux - Hiraku Toyooka, Hitachi
Linux has already been used in real-time systems. Current mainline Linux supports a variety of real-time features such as deterministic scheduling, kernel preemption, high-resolution timer and IRQ thread. In addition, we can get more deterministic behavior by using PREEMPT_RT patch set. To benefit from those features, we need to pay attention to many kernel configurations, use of appropriate APIs and hardware settings. In this presentation, I will talk about how to enable those real-time features and how to evaluate real-time performance by tools such as rt-tests or by your own program. I will also show measurement results in some ARM Cortex-A boards.

Speakers
HT

Hiraku Toyooka, Hitachi

Software Engineer, Hitachi
Hiraku Toyooka is a Software Engineer who has been working at Hitachi since 2010. His current working area is industrial control systems. He developed "snapshot" interface for ftrace which was merged into Linux 3.9. He has made presentations about ftrace enhancement (LinuxCon Japan... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 14

11:15am

LiMux And The FOSS Ecosystem - Stefan Koehler
The LiMux project has gained worldwide attention when the City Of Munich decided to switch to a linux­based client in 2003. Today more than 15.000 clients run on LiMux. This talk will shed light on the initial decision process, the projects history und current state. It will get you to know the technical base that secured the projects success and the infrastructure used for system and configuration management.

LiMux heavily relies on FOSS components like (K)Ubuntu, Puppet, LibreOffice or Firefox. The talk will highlight the requirements to use FOSS in an enterprise environment, how well these requirements were met and what developpers might bear in mind to make life easier for people actually using their software on a larger scale.

From the very beginning the LiMux projects has been under immense attack from various sides. Nevertheless it became a huge success and working on a linux­based client has become routine for the majority of Munich's employees. The talk will conclude by trying to draw a picture of the projects future and how LiMux and the community may interact closer to make both worlds better.

Speakers
SK

Stefan Koehler

Stefan Koehler works as freelance software consultant. Being an avid supporter of Free Software, he has been involved in the LiMux adventure from the very beginning until today. Currently working as Test Analyst, he intimately knows the projects ups and downs. Stefan has been active... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 02

12:15pm

Best Practices for MySQL High Availability - Colin Charles, SkySQL
The MySQL world is full of tradeoffs and choosing a High Availability (HA) solution is no exception. This session aims to look at all of the alternatives in an unbiased nature. Preference is of course only given to opensource solutions. How do you choose between: MySQL replication, MHA, DRBD, Tungsten, Galera Cluster? Do you integrate Pacemaker and Heartbeat like Percona Replication Manager? Is NDB Cluster right for your workload? The cloud brings even more fun as geographical redundancy is rolled into this. This and more will be covered in a walkthrough of MySQL HA options and when you will apply them.

Speakers
avatar for Colin Charles

Colin Charles

principal consultant, grok
Colin Charles is the Managing Consultant at GrokOpen. Previously, Colin was on the founding team of MariaDB Server, worked at MySQL and Percona, and worked actively on the Fedora and OpenOffice.org projects. Colin has been a MySQL user since 2000. He’s well known within open source communities, enjoys building business and market entry in APAC and has spoken at many conferences... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 02

12:15pm

Btrfs: Current Status and Future Prospects - Satoru Takeuchi, Fujitsu
- The status of Btrfs from the perspective of enterprise usage.
Functions, stability, performance, and so on.
- What kind of problems are fixed recently.
- Btrfs as the best backend of Docker.
- How/what we will do next
- Improve the stability
- RAID5/6
- btrfsck

Speakers
ST

Satoru Takeuchi, Fujitsu

Linux Kernel Developer, Fujitsu
I've been a linux kernel developer at Fujitsu since 2005. Fujitsu has contributed to Btrfs very much for a long time. For example, over 40% of Btrfs patches are from Fujitsu between v3.14 and v3.15. Currently I'm a full-time Btrfs developer. Besides Btrfs, I've also contributed to... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 14

12:15pm

etcd: Locking and Discovery For Lots of Servers - Brandon Philips, CoreOS
The architectural patterns of a large scale platform are changing. Dedicated VMs and configuration management tools are being replaced by containerization and new service management technologies like systemd. This presentation will be giving an overview of their key technologies, including etcd, fleet, and docker. Come and learn how to use these new technologies to build performant, reliable, large distributed system

Speakers
JP

Johan Philippine

CEO, CoreOs
Alex Polvi is the CEO of CoreOS, a Y-Combinator funded start-up, focusing on building a new operating system for massive server deployments. Prior to CoreOS Alex was GM for Rackspace Hosting, Bay Area, overseeing cloud product development. Alex joined Rackspace through the acquisition... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 16

2:30pm

Coming Soon, an Open Source Project Near You – the Linaro LNG Open Data Plane Initiative - Michael Christofferson, Enea
ARM formed the Linaro consortium in 2010, a non-profit organization composed now of over 20 industry leading companies. Linaro's aim is to provide an open source common software and tools foundation for the industry to use - making it easier and quicker to develop Linux-based products. In 2013 Linaro formed a “sub-group” called the Linaro Networking Group (LNG). LNG with twelve industry leading hardware and software vendors has since launched a new initiative called “Open Data Plane”, or ODP. ODP is an initiative designed to promote an open API specification, and an open source and cross platform implementation for high performance data plane packet processing that is independent of current solutions that require software or hardware vendor “lock-in”, like Intel's DPDK and Freescale's USDPAA, etc. This presentation is an overview of a) what ODP is, and b) the current status of ODP.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Christofferson, Enea

Michael Christofferson, Enea

Product Marketing Director, Enea
Previous speaking: 2014 - 1) ELC San Jose, April 29-May 2, 2014, "User Space Drivers in Linux – Pros, Cons, and Implementation Issues. In 2013 - 1) Linux Embedded Systems Conference San Franciso, Feb 20-22 2013 on the "Yocto Meta-Virtualization Project", 2) LinuxCon/Cloud Open North... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Room 16

2:30pm

Solving the Package Problem - Joe 'Zonker' Brockmeier, Red Hat
In the beginning there was RPM (and Debian packages) and it was good. Certainly, Linux packaging has solved many problems and pain points for system admins and developers over the years -- but as software development and deployment have evolved, new pain points have cropped up that have not been solved by traditional packaging.

In this talk, Joe Brockmeier will run through some of the problems that admins and developers have run into, and some of the solutions that organizations should be looking at to solve their issues with developing and deploying software. This includes Software Collections, Docker containers, OStree and rpm-ostree, Platform-as-a-Service, and more.

Monday October 13, 2014 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Room 02

3:30pm

GitLab as an Alternative Development Platform for Github.com - Ralf Lang, B1 Systems GmbH
github.com provides git environments to software projects allowing public source code sharing and management and sharing. Should you need github-like services strictly inhouse, consider GitLab. It runs entirely on your own hardware, allowing you to stay firmly in control of your source code. GitLab provides a web interface for file editing and a clone-edit-merge workflow with code review. Checkouts can be done either via ssh or https. GitLab uses fine-grained access controls to determine who should just be able to report issues, to review code and to actually edit it. Use GitLab CI to create a full-blown continuous integration framework. GitLab CI triggers
automatic software builds and testing upon code changes.
This talk introduces GitLab fundamentals and includes a demonstration of how to set up access controls, code review and the clone-edit-merge workflow.

Speakers
RL

Ralf Lang, B1 Systems GmbH

Developer, B1 Systems GmbH
Ralf Lang is a developer and consultant with B1 Systems GmbH where he focuses on integration and automation solutions. He is also one of the core developers of the Open Source groupware Horde. His previous speaking experience includes giving a presentation at FrühjahrsFachgespräch... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 14

4:30pm

Software Defined Storage: Changing the Rules for Storage Architects - Ric Wheeler, Red Hat
Software Defined Storage, to those of us who have been writing storage software for years, sounds like yet another marketing term. In effect, software defined storage changes the model for how our users do storage - they buy the hardware and storage architects write the software. This talk will give an overview of how that impacts storage architects and also discuss how open source software plays an important role in making SDS viable for both storage designers and storage consumers.

Speakers
avatar for Ric Wheeler

Ric Wheeler

Senior Director, Engineering - Storage, Red Hat
Ric works at Red Hat as the senior director engineering where he leads a team that is working on the integration of storage into the new generation of platforms. Previously, Ric leads the Red Hat Storage Engineering team which is built around three acquisitions that he helped identify... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 02

4:30pm

Getting the Most Out of Your Code With Help From the Compiler - Thiago Macieira, Intel
Traditionally, supporting new processor instructions required writing assembly code. Those days, processors are very complex and maintaining assembly code by hand is a hard and tedious task, not to mention that processors evolve and getting the timings right of each generation is better left to the compiler. A little known feature of the compilers is that it is possible to get access to certain instructions from high-level C and C++ code. Yet modern compilers can offer more functionality to help the bold developer write better code. This presentation will present those techniques and show which ones work on GCC, Clang and the Intel compiler. It will also show how to get more information on which intrinsics exist and what they do. It will draw heavily upon the presenter's experience implementing this very type of optimisations for Qt 5.3.

Speakers
TM

Thiago Macieira, Intel

Intel
Thiago Macieira holds a double degree in Engineering and an MBA. He has been involved in several Open Source projects for over 15 years and is an experienced C++ developer, having spent the better part of the last 10 years developing Qt and Qt-based software. He was also behind the... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 14

4:30pm

Open Source Governance Round Table: What's Hot ? - Tom Callaway, Red Hat; Shane Coughlan, OIN; Eileen Evans, HP; Karen Sandler, Software Freedom Conservancy and Bruno Cornec, HP (Moderator)
The goal of this round table is to share the latest news in the area of Open Source Governance. Topics covered will include: - Status on SPDX, LSB, FHS - licenses (e.g: analysis, new comers, usage example), - tools (e.g: license analysis, software evaluation, reference web sites), - best governance practices (e.g: return of experience, distribution adoption of tags, portability) Panelists will include representatives from large enterprises, tool providers, LF WG sharing their expertise around this domain.

Moderators
avatar for Bruno Cornec

Bruno Cornec

Open Source & Technology Strategist, HPE
Bruno Cornec has been managing various Unix systems since 1987 and Linux since 1993 (0.99pl14).Bruno first worked 8 years around Software Engineering and Configuration Management Systems in Unix environments.Since 1995, he is Open Source and Linux (OSL) Technology Strategist, Linux... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Tom Callaway

Tom Callaway

University Outreach Lead, Red Hat
The Fedora Project is a community of people working together to build a free and open source software platform and to collaborate on and share user-focused solutions built on that platform. Or, in plain English, we make an operating system and we make it easy for you do useful stuff... Read More →
avatar for Shane Coughlan

Shane Coughlan

OpenChain General Manager, Linux Foundation
Shane Coughlan is an expert in communication, security and business development. His professional accomplishments include spearheading the licensing team that elevated Open Invention Network into the largest patent non-aggression community in history, establishing the leading professional... Read More →
EE

Eileen Evans

Eileen Evans is the Vice President and Deputy General Counsel of Cloud and Open Source for Hewlett-Packard Company. In her role, Eileen leads and manages legal support for cloud computing and legal and program management support for open source at HP. Eileen also leads HP's Open... Read More →
KS

Karen Sandler

Executive Director, Software Freedom Conservancy
Karen M. Sandler is Executive Director of the Software Freedom Conservancy, the nonprofit home of dozens of essential free software projects. She is known for her advocacy for free and open source software, particularly in relation to the software on medical devices. She was previously... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 01

5:30pm

BoFs: TPM Subsystem - Peter Huewe
Join us in a discussion about the changes in the TPM subsystem of the Linux Kernel.

Topics Include:
  • State of the TPM Subsystem
  • De-/Initialization Mess
  • Devm'ification
  • Testing
  • TPM 2.0 Support
  • Dependencies / interaction with other subsystems (e.g. keyring / IMA)
  • Status of old 1.1b TPM drivers, deprecation plans

Speakers

Monday October 13, 2014 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Room 01

5:30pm

BoFs: First Failure Data Capture for Linux - Michael Holzheu & Michael Müller, IBM
We will present an overview of our ideas in the FFDC presentation on the Tracing Summit (http://sched.co/1tysvUS). Let's take some more time to discuss how FFDC could be implemented in Linux.
The audience is anyone who is interested and especially people that have experience in Linux problem determination. For example, people developing embedded systems, tracing/logging system owners, or owners of software components that provide debugging data. Please share your experience and ideas with us!

Speakers
avatar for Michael Holzheu

Michael Holzheu

Mr., IBM
Michael Holzheu is a Linux kernel developer at the IBM lab in Boeblingen, Germany. He studied computer science at the University of Erlangen and has worked for IBM since 1998. After a start in the z/OS UNIX Systems Services environment, he joined the Linux on z Systems team in 2000... Read More →
MM

Michael Müller

Michael Mueller is a System Software developer at the IBM Lab in Boeblingen, Germany. He studied Computer Science at the Universities of Erlangen and Dortmund and Business Administration at the Henley Management College. He joined IBM in 1991 when he worked for the education departmenton... Read More →


Monday October 13, 2014 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Room 8
 
Tuesday, October 14
 

11:15am

Building a Secure, Trustworthy and Freedom-Respecting Linux Platform - Matthew Garrett, Nebula
Linux is everywhere, from our pockets to our supercomputers. And as our lives become more entwined with the devices we interact with every day, Linux becomes more attractive as a target for people who want to learn more about us. If we're lucky, they just want our email credentials or credit card details. If we're unlucky, they want the contents of our phone calls and our precise locations. Security is important.

Unfortunately, so far security has often been proposed at the expense of freedom - and vice-versa. People buy locked-down devices because they trust them more. People install replacement operating systems by disabling security features. But this isn't fundamental. We can have both security and freedom. This presentation will discuss how and why it's important.

Speakers
MG

Matthew Garrett

Staff Security Developer, Google
Matthew Garrett is a security developer at Google, working on infrastructural security for Linux desktop and mobile platforms.


Tuesday October 14, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 2

11:15am

Digital TV on Linux - Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Samsung
Linux is conquering the world, being spread on al kinds of computers. With the advent of the Internet of Things, it is time for Linux to also enter into embedded devices, including TV sets, Set Top Boxes, etc. However, nowadays, most of the existing Linux DVB applications have incomplete support, as they're based on an API deprecated in 2008. So, they're not fully compatible with the current requirements for newer video standards, like DVB-T2, DVB-C2 and ISDB-T. This presentation's goal is to present the current view by the Linux TV maintainers, and what approach is being taken for it to work in Kernel space and the advances around an userspace library (libdvbv5).

Speakers
avatar for Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Samsung

Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Samsung

Linux Kernel Media Maintainer, Samsung
Mauro is the upstream maintainer of the Linux kernel media and EDAC subsystems, and also a major contributor for the Reliability Availability and Serviceability (RAS) subsystems. Mauro also maintains Tizen on Yocto packages upstream. He works for the Samsung Open Source Group since... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 8

11:15am

ZFS: Love Your Data - Neal Walfield, John Hopkins University
ZFS is (along with BTRFS) a next generation file system. ZFS improves
upon the reliability, flexibility, performance and scalability of
traditional file systems. ZFS better protects your data by hashing
stored data and making updates to the underlying drives atomic, which
RAID, by itself, cannot do. ZFS is flexible: it is a copy-on-write
file system, which enables inexpensive snapshotting of data sets.
This, in turn, enables quickly rolling back a data set to a given
snapshot or even forking a data set. ZFS also supports hierarchical
storage management: it can use an SSD to transparently cache reads.
Finally, ZFS is scalable: some existing installations have over a PB
of storage.

In this talk, Neal Walfield will present ZFS's features and
provide practical advice on how to deploy ZFS both at home and in the
business environment.

Speakers
NH

Neal H. Walfield

John Hopkins University
Neal is currently a part-time PhD student at the Johns Hopkins University and a part-time free lancer. He specializes in systems and system security. He is also interested in Machine Learning. In the past, Neal has worked on the Hurd (among other things, he wrote the POSIX threading... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 02

11:15am

Use "strace" to Understand Linux - Harald König, Bosch-Sensortec GmbH
strace is a great tool to analyze running programs, understand what they are doing and how they work (or why they don't), get information about performance aspects and data flows. Harald Koenig shows how using strace both helps to analyze problems and learn more and understand how Linux works by watching the (posix) kernel call interface.

In the tutorial he will show "hands on" in a command line terminal session how to use strace in some examples and explain in detail what the huge amount strace output is all about (up to getting graph charts with gnuplot to visualize and understand timing or statistics data).

Speakers
avatar for Harald König

Harald König

System Expert, Bosch Sensortec GmbH
I studied physics and started with Linux (kernel 0.98.4) in 1992 (UNIX since 1987), XFree86 (S3 cards) since 1993, using and working on (La)TeX since 1987 and co-founded the german TeX users group DANTE e.V. I've given talks on several german FOSS/Linux conferences, and some project... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 11:15am - 1:05pm
Room 16

12:15pm

Linux Performance Tools - Brendan Gregg, Netflix
There are many performance tools nowadays for Linux, but how do they all fit together, and when do we use them? This talk summarizes the three types of performance tools: observability, benchmarking, and tuning, providing a tour of what exists and why they exist. Advanced tools including those based on tracepoints, kprobes, and uprobes are also included: perf_events, ktap, SystemTap, LTTng, and sysdig. You'll gain a good understanding of the performance tools landscape, knowing what to reach for to get the most out of your systems.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Gregg

Brendan Gregg

Senior Performance Architect, Netflix
Brendan Gregg is an industry expert in computing performance and cloud computing. He is a senior performance architect at Netflix, where he does performance design, evaluation, analysis, and tuning. He is the author of Systems Performance published by Prentice Hall, and received the... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 2

12:15pm

Testing Video4Linux Applications and Drivers - Hans Verkuil, Cisco
The video4linux subsystem of the kernel is a very large API with many ioctls, settings, options and capabilities. This poses a problem both for the kernel developer and for the application developer. Since early this year major improvements have been made to both the v4l2-compliance utility for verifying drivers, and to the virtual video driver that applications can use as a reference input. This presentation will explain and demonstrate this utility and driver and show how to use them to ensure your driver or application works correctly.

Speakers
HV

Hans Verkuil

Sr. R&D Software Engineer, Cisco Systems Norway
Hans Verkuil started contributing patches to the MPEG encoder/decoder ivtv driver in early 2004 and it snowballed from there. Since 2013 he is a video4linux co-maintainer responsible for V4L2 bridge drivers and video receivers and transmitters. Since 2016, he also maintains the HDMI... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 02

12:15pm

Improving Application Responsiveness and I/O Latency With the BFQ I/O Scheduler - Paolo Valente, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy
BFQ (Budget Fair Queueing) is a storage-I/O scheduler with some new or
improved features with respect to existing research and production
schedulers. One of the nice features of BFQ is that it guarantees a
high application responsiveness, regardless of the background I/O
workload. BFQ also guarantees a low latency to soft real-time
applications, such as multimedia players. These features do not come
at the cost of any loss of throughput, with respect to existing I/O
schedulers. On the contrary, BFQ even outperforms the latter with some
combinations of workloads and devices. Finally, BFQ seems to be on the
right track to be merged into mainline, and replace the current
default I/O scheduler. In this presentation, Paolo Valente will show
BFQ in action, and describe some of its inner workings.

Speakers
avatar for Paolo Valente

Paolo Valente

Assistant Professor of CS, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy
Paolo Valente is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy. Some of his activities focus on scheduling algorithms for transmission links, storage devices, and CPUs. As for transmission links, Paolo is one of the authors of the... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 14

2:30pm

Square Pegs in Round holes, or System Level Performance Data and perf - Pawel Moll, ARM
The perf framework, as useful as it is, has been primarily designed with the processor executing code in mind and it fits this use case very well. Unfortunately in modern and complex systems, the overall performance more and more depends on the system level infrastructure, with memory system interfaces being the most important ones. As this kind of hardware usually comes with some kind of performance monitors, it can be more than useful to allow user to use them. Unfortunately the perf infrastructure is much less suitable for this, requiring some workarounds and simplifications. I will show what has been done so far, using "uncore" PMU drivers x86 and ARM "CCI" and "CCN" interconnects as example and discu
ss what could be done to improve the situation.

Speakers
avatar for Pawel Moll

Pawel Moll

Principal Engineer, ARM
I've worked with so called "embedded Linux" for more then ten years now, currently for ARM in Cambridge, UK as a Principal Engineer, with main focus on Linux developer tools, in all possible form and shape. My recent interest include performance analysis and optimisation. Every now... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Room 14

2:30pm

Optimizing Linux Servers - What Has Been Changed From Last year? - Davor Guttierrez, 3 Gen d.o.o.
Linux Server is optimized for average workloads. With most servers you can gain much by optimizing performance. Last year we discussed about optimizing old stuff, now we have 10 GB networks, new kernels and new hardware. How can we improve everything in our servers. We have virtualization on different platforms like KVM and XEN, what is the best optimization for guest machines?

Speakers
avatar for Davor Guttierrez

Davor Guttierrez

System Administrator, 3 Gen d.o.o.
Davor Guttierrez works as a System Administrator at 3 Gen d.o.o. He has been working with Linux and UNIX for 20 years, most recently on RedHat Enterprise Virtualization and SuSE Linux Enterprise Servers.


Tuesday October 14, 2014 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Room 2

3:30pm

UserModeLinux Status Report - Richard Weinberger, Sigma Star GmbH
UserModeLinux (UML) was one of the first virtualization technologies for Linux, also known as "a port of Linux to its own user space ABI". Currently almost everyone is using KVM, XEN or VMware to virtualize Linux. But UML still exists and has users. Richard observed that many kernel developers have no clue how UML works and therefore break it from time to time without even noticing.

In this talk he gives an overview of UML and its internals. The key points are:
  • Why UML has still users and what the use cases are
  • How to build and test it
  • On which other sub systems it depends (and how it can break)
  • How it works
  • Emerging new features like SMP support and x86-compat mode
  • Limitations and problems of the current implementation
  • Discussion with other kernel developers how Richard can help that UML does not hinder others work

Speakers
avatar for Richard Weinberger

Richard Weinberger

co-founder, sigma star gmbh
Richard Weinberger is co-founder of sigma star gmbh and offers Linux kernel consulting services. He's been working with Linux for 10 years and works on the Linux kernel for more than five years. Besides of the kernel he has a strong focus on various low level components of Linux including... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 16

3:30pm

Chromium and Linux Distributions - Paweł Hajdan, Jr., Google
Chromium is an open-source web browser project, packaged by distributions like Debian, Ubuntu, Arch and Gentoo among others, but notably not Fedora. In 2009 an article called "Chromium: Why it isn't in Fedora yet as a proper package" by Tom Callaway explained some reasons for that. In this presentation, Paweł Hajdan, Jr. will review the original article and state of Chromium as of 2014, explaining what the project is doing to accommodate needs, guidelines, and policies of Linux distributions (such as using system libraries), and what are the main challenges it faces.

Speakers
PH

Paweł Hajdan, Jr.

Software Engineer, Google
Paweł is a Chromium project developer since 2008. He got a job working on Google Chrome after becoming the first committer from outside the company. Leading a small team of Gentoo Linux developers packaging Chromium, he also helps other Linux distribution developers. Pawe... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 2

3:30pm

TSAR (TimeSeries AggregatoR) - How to Count Tens of Billions of Daily Events in Real Time Using Open Source Technologies - Anirudh Todi, Twitter
Twitter's 250 million users generate over 50 billion tweet views per day. Aggregating these events in real time - in a robust enough way to incorporate into our products - presents a massive scaling challenge. In this talk I'll introduce TSAR (the TimeSeries AggregatoR), a robust, flexible, and scalable service for real-time event aggregation designed to solve this problem and a range of similar ones. I'll discuss how we built TSAR from the ground up, almost entirely on open-source technologies (Storm, Summingbird, Kafka, Aurora, and others), and describe some of the challenges we faced in scaling it to process tens of billions of events per day.

Speakers
avatar for Anirudh Todi

Anirudh Todi

Software Engineering Manager, Twitter Inc
At Twitter, Anirudh works on the Data Platform team. Anirudh and his team are chartered with processing and understanding the vast body of data that is generated by the operation of the Twitter platform. Their technologies are used to build a range of cutting-edge services that can... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 02

4:30pm

Automated Linux Kernel Crash Infrastructure - Eye In the Digital Sky - Igor Ljubuncic, Intel
While robust and generally stable, the Linux operating system may suffer from occasional bugs in the kernel stack, sometimes leading to an irrecoverable condition known as kernel oops. The condition can translate into a system panic, resolved only by a reboot. In time-to-market critical data center environments, kernel crashes can impact the productivity of compute resources. Resolving bugs in the kernel code that cause the panic situations is of paramount importance. In homogenous environments, where a single operating system dominates the install base, individual bugs can potentially manifest on all machines in a very short period of time. In this presentation, Igor Ljubuncic presents on how Intel’s IT transformed its business with an automated Linux kernel crash collection, analysis and reporting infrastructure, designed to address stability of the system’s core – the kernel.

Speakers
avatar for Igor Ljubuncic, Intel

Igor Ljubuncic, Intel

OS Architect, Intel Corporation
Igor Ljubuncic is an OS architect within Intel's IT Engineering Computing business group. He works on exploring and developing solutions for a large, global high-performance Linux environment that supports Intel's chip design. Igor has significant experience presenting at conferences... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 16

4:30pm

Present and Future File Serving with Samba - Michael Adam, SerNet GmbH
Samba is the most important open source SMB file serving software, and arguably, one of the most important SMB implementations out there, being shipped with all major Linux distributions and part of many big and small storage appliances. A lot has happened in Samba's file server in the last couple of years, and this talk first describes file serving with Samba in the age of Samba 4: Samba 4.0 was released as the Active Directory server release, but it was also a very big file server relase with a lot of new changes and new features.

With the introduction of SMB version 3, Microsoft moves from pure workstation workload focus to server workloads, aiming to partly replace block storage. In particular Microsoft catches up with Samba/CTDB to offer all-active clustering. The second part of this talk describes current work in progress in this area and where the Samba file server is heading.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Adam

Michael Adam

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Michael Adam is an enthusiastic open source software developer, interested in all things about storage and containers. One of the main developers of Samba since more than a decade, Michael is an engineering manager at Red Hat, leading two worldwide teams: The Samba team for Gluster... Read More →


Tuesday October 14, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 01
 
Wednesday, October 15
 

11:15am

Using Persistent Memory Effectively - Matthew Wilcox, Intel
Previous presentations on Persistent Memory have focused on the challenges that arise when providing raw access to the PM. This presentation focuses on the challenges facing user programs when they try to use PM. Matthew will review some of the difficulties in using mmaped storage (whether backed by PM or a regular file), and present some best practices and solutions included in the NVM Library.

Speakers
MW

Matthew Wilcox

Programmer, Oracle
Matthew works for Oracle on a variety of kernel projects. He has spoken at many Linux conferences on topics such as NVM Express, Persistent Memory and the XArray


Wednesday October 15, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 8

11:15am

Community Best Practices: Understanding and Using the Developer Certificate of Origin - James Bottomley, Parallels
Now that the DCO is free from the kernel (http://developercertificate.org/) it can be used in any project. This talk begins with why you need a Contributor Agreement (CA) in the first place, explores some of the history and reasons for the various CAs and why Linux was forced to adopt the DCO nearly ten years ago. We will contrast the ten years of DCO experience against some other projects which use more specific CAs and explain the benefits and pitfalls. We will also give advice on best practices around using the DCO, what else is required to make the DCO work correctly and what problems still remain. Finally we will synthesise some conclusions about how much protection the DCO provides and some general advice about whether an additional CA is needed for your project.

The audience is anyone interested in setting up an open source project, participating in an existing open source project or people who just want to be aware of best community practices around projects. 

Understanding the DCO better reduces fragmentation and increases the probability that community projects won't trip over CAs or will end up alienating potential contributors for non technical reasons.  

Speakers
avatar for James Bottomley

James Bottomley

Distinguished Engineer, IBM
James Bottomley is a Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research where he works on Cloud and Container technology. He is also Linux Kernel maintainer of the SCSI subsystem. He has been a Director on the Board of the Linux Foundation and Chair of its Technical Advisory Board. He went to... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 11:15am - 12:05pm
Room 01

12:15pm

ACPI And Device Trees - Friends Or Foes? - Rafael J. Wysocki, Intel OTC
ACPI was introduced when hardware compatibility with the IBM PC became insufficient to maintain the PC ecosystem. It allowed a single binary OS image to run on various platforms using the same CPU architecture, but not exactly hardware-compatible with one another. Today, Device Trees are used to address the same platform fragmentation problem in the ARM ecosystem. Of course, there are differences between ACPI and DT. Unlike DT, ACPI had a difficulty with passing arbitrary data to the OS, but that limitation is now being removed. With ACPI now able to provide the same data as DT, a need has arisen for a shared firmware-interface-agnostic specification of hardware properties. Similarly, the platform firmware interface access for device drivers in the OS should be unified, so the same driver can work equally well on systems with ACPI or DT. I will discuss work toward that goal in Linux.

Speakers
avatar for Rafael J. Wysocki

Rafael J. Wysocki

Software Engineer, Intel OTC
Rafael maintains the Linux kernel's core ACPI and power management code, including the core infrastructure for IO device PM, CPU PM and system suspend/hibernation. He works at Intel Open Source Technology Center as a Software Engineer focusing on the mainline Linux kernel. Rafael... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 8

12:15pm

Automatic NUMA Balancing - Rik van Riel, Red Hat
In NUMA systems, each CPU has its own bank of memory, resulting in fast access to local memory, and slower access to memory elsewhere in the system. Recently a mechanism has been implemented in the Linux kernel to automatically run programs near their memory, and to move memory to near the programs using it. This presentation explains why computers are built this way, why NUMA locality matters, how the automatic NUMA balancing kernel code works, what it can do, and what kind of performance improvements have been observed. This presentation is also a good opportunity to discuss recent and future developments for the automatic NUMA balancing code.

Speakers
RV

Rik Van Riel

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Rik van Riel is a principal software engineer at Red Hat, and a long term contributor to the Linux kernel. He has contributed to the memory management subsystem, the scheduler, and various components related to virtualization. Rik is active in community projects like kernelnewbies.org... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 14

12:15pm

Collaboration Beyond Development - Co-opetition and the Long Game - Shane Coughlan, OIN
Collaboration around Open Source has lead to common strategic goals for SMEs and multinationals across the world. It is characterised by a social movement of co-opetition - simultaneous competition and cooperation - where companies compete on products but collaborate on platforms. The underlying concept is “Smart Innovation” that empowers everyone to make better products and services. This leads to a corresponding refinement in the way many companies approach “IPR” strategy. Such refinement initially focused on acceptance of Copyright licenses like the GPL but has evolved to include other areas of business strategy. Most strikingly, today the Linux System has the largest patent cross-license community in the world by a wide margin, with EMEA companies being some of the most numerous and active participants. This talk unpacks what is happening and discusses where we are going next.

This talk is suitable for legal and business decision-makers with a governance or strategy role. It does not presume pre-knowledge of existing activities.

Speakers
avatar for Shane Coughlan

Shane Coughlan

OpenChain General Manager, Linux Foundation
Shane Coughlan is an expert in communication, security and business development. His professional accomplishments include spearheading the licensing team that elevated Open Invention Network into the largest patent non-aggression community in history, establishing the leading professional... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 16

12:15pm

Kernel Event Tracing on the Mainframe - Michael Holzheu, IBM
Because mainframes traditionally run mission critical workloads, serviceability has always been of high importance to the platform. Customers expect that the root cause of a problem can be found with the first set of debug data that is collected. Reproducing the error is not welcome and must be avoided. With this in mind, IBM provided the s390dbf kernel tracing infrastructure when Linux was ported to the s390 architecture at the beginning of 2000. This was about eight years before Linux ftrace and tracepoints were integrated into the upstream Linux kernel. In some areas, tracepoints offer advantages, for example, per-CPU trace buffers or an event streaming capability. Yet, tracepoints do not offer all features that are needed for s390. This presentation reviews the two tracing features and shows what would have to be added to tracepoints to achieve the same functionality as s390dbf.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Holzheu

Michael Holzheu

Mr., IBM
Michael Holzheu is a Linux kernel developer at the IBM lab in Boeblingen, Germany. He studied computer science at the University of Erlangen and has worked for IBM since 1998. After a start in the z/OS UNIX Systems Services environment, he joined the Linux on z Systems team in 2000... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 12:15pm - 1:05pm
Room 02

2:30pm

How to Design a Linux Kernel API - Michael Kerrisk, man7.org
The Linux kernel-user-space API is littered with design errors: APIs that are non-extensibe, unmaintainable, overly complex, limited-purpose, violations of standards, and inconsistent. Most of those mistakes can't be fixed because doing so would break the ABI that the kernel presents to user-space binaries. To further rub salt into the wound, kernel-user-space APIs are often buggy when first shipped.

Thus, it's important to get API designs right the first time. Taking (good and bad) examples from past APIs, I'll cover a number ideas on improving the design of future kernel user-space APIs. Those tips are relevant both for kernel developers producing the APIs and for user-space programmers looking at what kernel developers are serving to them. I'll also look at some strategies that developers can pursue in order to get help with improving the designs of APIs that they are producing.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Kerrisk

Michael Kerrisk

Trainer/consultant, man7.org Training and Consulting
Michael Kerrisk is the author of the acclaimed book, "The Linux Programming Interface" (http://man7.org/tlpi/), a guide and reference for system programming on Linux and UNIX. He contributes to the Linux kernel primarily via documentation, review, and testing of new kernel-user-space... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Room 14

2:30pm

P Factor – Innovate Your Interactive Experience - Igor Ljubuncic, Intel
Intel’s chip design is a unique setup where interactive work by engineers is conducted through VNC connections to high-end multi-user servers, with heavy dependence on NFS traffic and data. A continuous and exponential increase in multi-core and memory capacity in recent years creates a challenge - how many users can comfortably work on a typical server in the interactive work model? Indeed, interactive users observe and report degraded experience and slowness in their sessions, although CPU and memory are hardly utilized. In this presentation, Igor Ljubuncic elaborates on a novel approach to studying user experience on interactive machines and developing a proactive framework for measuring and optimizing performance. Igor presents a formula named P Factor for objectively determining interactive usage slowness in I/O operations.

Speakers
avatar for Igor Ljubuncic, Intel

Igor Ljubuncic, Intel

OS Architect, Intel Corporation
Igor Ljubuncic is an OS architect within Intel's IT Engineering Computing business group. He works on exploring and developing solutions for a large, global high-performance Linux environment that supports Intel's chip design. Igor has significant experience presenting at conferences... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Room 02

2:30pm

Tutorial: Qubes OS: Practical Intro for Users and Developers - Joanna Rutkowska & Marek Marczykowski-Gorecki, Invisible Things Lab
This practical tutorial on Qubes OS will be comprised of presentations intermixed with live demos and is for anyone interested in getting the most out of, or developing for Qubes OS. Some experience with Linux command line recommended. Topics include: 

Part 1 (for Users and Power Users)
  • Basics (Qubes Trusted Desktop, AppVMs, TemplateVMs)
  • Networking (NetVMs, ProxyVMs, Firewalling, TorVM)
  • Storage (Block devices handling, UsbVM)
  • Disposable VMs (Unique features, customization)
  • Qubes Apps (qrexec basics, Split GPG, PDF convert)
  • Windows AppVMs (installation, templates)

Part 2 (for Power Users & Developers)

  • Qubes Inter-VM services/RPC (qrexec, policies)
  • Writing and running "Hello World" qrexec app
  • Porting Window Managers (e.g. porting Awsome)
  • Qubes Builder (unique features, typical workflows)
  • Building new templates (e.g. Debian template)
  • What's coming in Qubes R3/Odyssey

Speakers
MM

Marek Marczykowski-Gorecki

Biography coming soon.
JR

Joanna Rutkowska

Qubes Security Architect, Invisible Things Lab
Qubes OS project lead, previously researcher exploring weaknesses of virtualization and trusted computing technologies (Intel TXT, VT, vPro).


Wednesday October 15, 2014 2:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 2

3:30pm

First Glimpse at Shingled Drives - Hannes Reinecke, SUSE Labs
Recently storage vendors have advocated 'shingled media recording' devices. These drives are estimated to provide larger capacity than existing drives, but at the same time introduce a new access model. Hence it will not be possible to use them as all-purpose drives without modifications to the storage stack. For Linux there are two different proposals for handling these devices, either by using modified filesystems or by adding a device-mapper module.
This talk gives an overview about the technology behind shingled media recording and the proposed changes to the linux storage stack.
I will also present the results from running a modified stack on a pre-production device and its implications for further development.

Speakers
avatar for Hannes Reinecke

Hannes Reinecke

Teamlead Storage & Networking, SUSE Linux GmbH
Studied Physics with main focus image processing in Heidelberg from 1990 until 1997, followed by a PhD in Edinburgh 's Heriot-Watt University in 2000. Working at SUSE Labs with focus on storage and mainframe. Principal contact point for storage related issues on SLES and teamlead... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 14

3:30pm

Network Queuing is All Wet - Stephen Hemminger, Brocade
Why is my network slow? This is the most common user complaint in both
home and enterprise environments. Many of these problems are caused
by queuing problems in the network.

This talk will show some of the solutions developed, demonstrate how
they work, and identify where more work still needs to be done. The
demonstrations use the analogy of fluid dynamics to explain CoDel,
PIE, and other smart queuing mechanisms.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Hemminger

Stephen Hemminger

Principal Engineer, Microsoft
Stephen has been actively involved with Linux kernel development for over 10 years. He has contributed several network device drivers, a network emulator, and is the maintainer of the bridging and iproute2utilities. After leaving LF, he went on to Vyatta (now acquired by Brocade... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 8

3:30pm

Linux Capabilities: A Safer Root than SUID Root - Alessandro Selli, Synergia S.R.L.
Still in the III millennium some mainstream distributions come with SUID root binaries. Their security implications have long been known. A way to do without many of them without impacting regular user activities is presented. It's been long Linux was endowed with a safer and more fitting solution: meet capabilities(7), a modern, lean way to safely delegate a subset of superuser rights to unprivileged users. Learn their pros and cons compared to SUID and why it's high time that sysadmin be aware of them and that applications be designed to take advantage of them.

Speakers
AS

Alessandro Selli, Synergia S.R.L.

IT technical operations manager, Synergia S.R.L.
Linux sysadmin since 2002, holder of a LPI level 2 certificate, manager of the employer's LAN and mixed-environment infrastructure. Current projects include: 1) teacher of Linux-related courses, from beginner to sysadmin/network administrator, or LPI-certification level 1 and 2 oriented... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Room 02

4:30pm

Systematic Testing of Fault Handling Code in Linux Kernel - Alexey Khoroshilov, Russian Academy of Sciences
The talk presents a method to extend coverage of existing tests by systematic and targeted fault injection in Linux kernel. The method is developed within Linux File System Verification project that aims to provide an exhaustive test suite for Linux file system drivers.

The presented method of fault injection allows to systematically simulate faults dedicated to a file system driver under test (faults of memory allocation requests, bio layer, etc.). That means it does not introduce faults into requests coming from other modules and it implements systematic iteration of fault situations versus a prevailing random approach.

The talk presents results of experiments with the method, defines requirements to tests so they can be used with the method and discusses lessons learnt so far.

Speakers
avatar for Alexey Khoroshilov

Alexey Khoroshilov

Russian Academy of Sciences
Alexey Khoroshilov is a director of the Linux Verification Center of Institute for System Programming of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He has graduated from Computer Sciences Department of the Lomonosov's Moscow State University with honour and received a Ph.D. in Computer Sciences... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 8

4:30pm

Advanced Linux Server-Side Threats: How They Work and What You Can do About Them - Olivier Bilodeau and Marc-Etienne M.Léveillé, ESET
Server-side malware evolved. Attackers were motivated by defacement or direct damage, using small-scale and targeted operations. Nowadays we are seeing an increase in organized crimeware campaigns leveraging compromised Linux servers for financial gain through website redirections infecting end-users and spam. Furthermore, malicious gangs base their operation's infrastructure on these same servers, making takedown or law enforcement intervention complex.

This presentation will cover the evolution of Linux malware and describe the Windigo threats affecting more than 25 000 servers. We will give in-depth technical details on the malware involved, show how it is deployed by the operators and how they are able to defeat current defensive technologies. More importantly, we will describe hands-on detection and incident response tips to quickly assess one's servers and help in the fight.

Speakers
avatar for Olivier Bilodeau

Olivier Bilodeau

Malware Researcher, ESET
Coming from the dusty Unix server room world, Olivier evolved professionally in networking, information security and open source software development to become malware researcher at ESET. He likes to do memory forensic on infected servers, reverse engineer obfuscated Perl scripts... Read More →
avatar for M. M. Léveillé

M. M. Léveillé

Malware Researcher, ESET
Marc-Etienne is a malware researcher at ESET since 2012. He specializes in malware attacking unusual platform, whether it's fruity hardware or software from south pole birds. Lately, Marc-Etienne was mostly reverse engineering server-side malware to discover their inner working and... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 02

4:30pm

The Open Invention Network Linux System Definition - Defining the Scope of Linux Patent Non-Aggression - Mirko Boehm, Endocode
The Open Invention Network protects the Open Source ecosystem against litigation of software patents by acquiring patents and licensing them to entities. This networked, royalty-free non-aggression community can be joined by all entities and is defined by three pillars - the patents that are cross-licensed to participants, the community of licensees, and the field of use that is covered by the non-aggression pledge. Open Invention Network (OIN) focuses on protecting Linux, and the monitoring and inclusion of relevant Open Source technologies into it’s Linux System Definition is crucial to safeguarding “freedom to operate”, OIN’s central mission. The presentation will explain the nature of OIN’s non-aggression community, and introduce the Linux System Definition and the possibilities to contribute to its maintenance. The presenter is responsible for OIN's Linux System Definition.

Speakers
MB

Mirko Boehm

CEO, Open Invention Network
Mirko Boehm is a Free Software and Open Source contributor, primarily as a software developer and speaker. He is the founder of the Quartermaster project, and has been a contributor to major Open Source projects including the KDE Desktop since 1997, including several years on the... Read More →


Wednesday October 15, 2014 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Room 01